Live Within Your Means, Part 1

In my next several blogs I will cover topics related to money and marriage. These will be common sense principles related to how we handle our money within our marriage. So let’s get started.

First and foremost is a very simple concept. We should not spend more than we earn. Or live within your means. No matter who you are, you have a finite amount of income. If you spend more than you earn, you go into debt using other people’s money to finance your overspending. That will cost you even more in interest, fees, and late charges.

So are you are living within your means? First, add up your’s and your spouse’s net income after taxes for each month. If you have payroll deductions for a variety of items, add those deductions back in to your net pay to come up with a TRUE net pay for each pay period. Compute your yearly net pay then divide by 12 for your monthly amount. Add any other income you get from part time jobs, child care income, rents, royalties, dividends, interest, or any other income. Add all of these together and come up with a monthly net income for your household.

Next, together, list all recurring monthly expenses for your household. Go to your cash receipts, checkbook statement, credit and debit card bills, automatic pay bills, and payroll deductions for the last 4-6 months. Add everything. Mortgage, utilities, gas, food, clothing, household, all insurance, car payments and maintenance, cable, phones, loan payments, child care, donations, vacations, property taxes, dining out, daily coffee, gifts, pets, entertainment, school expenses, personal care, hobbies, dues for clubs and magazines, and any other expenses. Also track what you put into savings. Put all of these items into a simple spreadsheet with the like expenses listed in separate columns. For example, keep all types of insurance together. Be as specific as possible with each expense. Next, add the columns up and add all the columns together to get a grand total. Get an average for expense categories that vary month to month. For example, food expense will vary, but a four month average will probably give a good idea of what you spend.

That’s part one of looking at your expenses. Part two is a project. Each of you should track EVERYthing you spend for the next three months. Use the same spreadsheet, each DAY writing down what you spent in each category. Keep a spreadsheet each month, totaling them at month’s end. Now you have a clear picture of what you spend each month and you can come up with an accurate monthly average for each category.

Compare your average monthly income to your average monthly expenses. Is it positive income or negative? If it is a negative amount, you are spending more than you earn and will no doubt be going into debt. More on living within your means next time…..